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Author Topic: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma  (Read 254 times)

Offline Dan

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Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« on: May 09, 2017, 06:16:46 AM »
I have a young man that is interested in my Ninja 650.  He has never owned a motorcycle before and his only experience is mountain biking and he just passed his MSF course.  Now I know the Ninja isn't a powerhouse but it is very torquey with a snatchy throttle.  In our first email I gently suggested he might want to consider a smaller displacement bike to start but his counter-argument is that he wants a bike that he can grow into.  So what's the consensus, would you sell a Ninja 650 to a beginner?

Offline ExTex

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2017, 07:37:36 AM »
Never!

He might die before growing into it.
Or he most likely will give up on motorcycling as too dangerous.

Ride safely,
Sold:1983 CB650sc & VT500c & VF700S

Offline Rakillia

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2017, 08:54:06 AM »
I never understood the grow into theory. Like there's some mandatory minimum amount of time you must own something. You could by a bike and list it for sale the next day. You're not married to the thing. Buy what works now and when it no longer works sell it. They hold their value. You won't lose money as long as you don't buy new.

Offline DesignFlaw06

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2017, 09:22:25 AM »
Sell it to him.  It's his choice, not yours.  If you don't sell it to him, the next seller will.  People start out on Ninja 650's all the time because they are an inexpensive bike and tons of them are out there.

You can be stupid on any type of bike.  I know your bike has torque.  I've seen it.  But his mentality is what is going to determine his level of safety, not his bike.  The kid will likely be a squid, blowing his entire budget on a bike with no regards to gear. 

Voice your concerns if it makes you feel better, but I wouldn't lose a wink of sleep over it.

Offline naskie18

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2017, 05:28:32 PM »
I'd sell it to him.  You've voiced your concerns, but in the end it's up to him and if he wants that style/size bike, you not selling it to him won't stop him - there are plenty others out there he can buy.  Whether he can handle it and "grow into it" will depend on him. 

I started on a 750 in the interest of my first bike being something I could "grow into".  I didn't want to deal with the hassle of potentially selling a bike in a few months and then searching for another one because I got bored with the small bike I'd started on.  And yes, I would consider that to be a "hassle" - I don't find selling/searching/negotiating for vehicles that much fun.  I also thought it'd be easier to get used to motorcycling in general if I kept the bike constant over the first few years rather than potentially changing to a variety of different weight/power/style combinations in a short time while still being relatively inexperienced.

Right?  Wrong?  Indifferent?   hmmmm2    I have no complaints about how it worked out for me, I put over 30k miles on that bike before selling it four seasons later.  I wouldn't hesitate to start the same way if I were doing it again.
Nick

Offline det-drbuzzard

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2017, 06:12:03 PM »
a few years ago I was talking to a friend about selling a bike to someone with no real experience riding. I was doing the talking and when I shut up he told me that his 1200 Goldwing was his first bike, he learned to ride on it. when my nephew was living with me his riding experience was limited to Honda minitrails as a kid. I put him on my 450 nighthawk and about three weeks later a car cut him off and he went down, he had a cut on his hand cause his glove came off but the 450 had a broken shift lever. I still had not found a shift lever when his hand healed up so he started riding my 1200 goldwing

Offline DesignFlaw06

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2017, 06:15:24 AM »
My first ride after MSF was my dad's 1500 Goldwing.  I rode that until I got my first bike.  Price was the driving factor in going with the 650 Nighthawk.  I figured I would lay it down at some point (and I did), but it was still a bike that I liked the looks of and had enough power for me.  Plus I wanted to have money for gear.  I'm glad I didn't go with anything less than that actually.  Then again, I have a little more mass than many people.

If money was no object, I'm not sure what I would have bought back then. 

Offline footshooter5

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2017, 10:58:29 PM »
Agree with above posters who said to sell it to him.  He's an adult - he can make informed decisions. 

If he comes by to test drive it, I would make sure you have his cash in the palm of your hand before he puts one leg over your bike though...he'll drop it sooner or later...best if it's on his own dime.

Offline Wahrsuul

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2017, 04:25:35 AM »
As someone who started out on a small bike (GPz 305), I wish I'd gotten something a little bigger.  By the time the bike was broken in (I bought it new in '83), I was already bored on it.  Another year, and I was dying for something bigger.  Wish I'd held out for the GPz 550.  I think the new Ninja 650 is a decent starter bike, especially if he's tall/big enough to easily handle it.

Offline loudsubz

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2017, 05:07:35 AM »
Almost ever rider who buys. 125, 250 etc starter bike regrets it when they go to sell it a short time later. Bikes have throttles for a reason. It's not like you get on and press go and have to hang on. A stupid rider will be stupid on any bike.

Offline Rakillia

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2017, 06:34:55 PM »
My first ride after MSF was my dad's 1500 Goldwing.  I rode that until I got my first bike.  Price was the driving factor in going with the 650 Nighthawk.  I figured I would lay it down at some point (and I did), but it was still a bike that I liked the looks of and had enough power for me.  Plus I wanted to have money for gear.  I'm glad I didn't go with anything less than that actually.  Then again, I have a little more mass than many people.

If money was no object, I'm not sure what I would have bought back then.


I tell anyone who asks that the 83-85 CB650 is the perfect starter bike.  Cheap to buy and for parts.  Handles great, sits low and plenty of power when you wind it up. 

Offline RobbieAG

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Re: Motorcycle Sale Dilemma
« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2017, 07:19:19 PM »
I don't think the Ninja 650 would be a problem if he's taken the MSF and he's tall enough to flat foot it. If it was a ZX6R, that would be completely different. I told a guy that the ST1100 I was selling was not for him because he wasn't tall enough and it's heavy (I still have it).
2002 CB750 (sold), 2001 ST1100, 2005 ST1300

 

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