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Author Topic: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?  (Read 313 times)

Offline Adventurer

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Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« on: June 12, 2017, 11:54:30 PM »
Anyone tackle any of the Iron Butt Association (IBA) challenges via Honda Nighthawk (NH)?

If so, please share, here!

Kudos to you who have done it on other bikes and whatnot, but I'm specifically interested in what NH IBA experiences Nighthawk Forum (NHF) members might have to share.

I know some IBA members took their NH's around the world, right on through Siberia in '05, which is rad...so I know it can be done.

I'm contemplating some of IBA's entry level stuff, if I can find the time and a worthy destination and route, one of these days myself...we'll see!

Here's a pic of one of the IBA member's NH loaded up, through Siberia, shared with permission:




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Offline hppants

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Re: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2017, 06:15:35 AM »
I'm not an IBA member, but know and have met many of them through the FJR forum.

Getting certified for the Saddlesore 1000, which as you know if the most basic IBA certification, requires you to ride 1000 miles in 24 hours.  Even allowing for 6 hours of sleep, you only need to average 55 mph rolling to achieve this respectable accomplishment.  The easiest way to do that is to choose a route that:

1.  Includes interstates that have generous speed limits (70 mph minimum).
2.  Includes interstates that are not currently under large amounts of road construction
3.  Includes interstates that are not known to be heavy laden with traffic (I-10 between Houston and New Orleans would not be a good choice, for example)
4.  Includes planned fuel stops along the interstate at an exit that is very simple (on/off) and not congested with a bunch of other stores and crap.  This fuel stop needs to have at least two gas stations so you can make sure to get a documented receipt with your exact location, date, time, etc.  Many IBA efforts have been spoiled because the sole gas station had a pump without a working paper receipt machine.

Now - you also need a bike that has decent fuel range and wind protection, and can hold 70 mph on the slab without overstraining.  Certainly, a NH750 can handle that, but not without challenges.  When I had my NH750, living around sea level, my fuel mileage at 70mph constant would be in the 45 mpg range.  Given that, you must plan a stop every 200 miles.  That means you must make at least 4 stops to complete the challenge.  Still plenty doable given all other parameters.

Now, increasing to the butt burner gold 1500, things get a whole lot more interesting, especially with the fuel range of the NH.  Auxilliary fuel tanks can help that.

I've met some of the best LD riders in the world.  One guy I know is currently planning to ride a Multi-Trifecta BBG (more than one round of 3 consecutive Butt Burner Gold rides run consecutively) on an FJR with 200,000 miles currently on it.  Ironically, I just spoke with him a week ago while we were rallying at Yosemite.  These people are cut from a different cloth.  I liken them to marathon runners.  They want (need) to prove something to themselves.  I don't get it, but I get it - if that makes sense.

I think there are better bikes setup for LD riding than the nighthawk.  But with some basic planning and training, you can do it.  And if is something that interest you, I say go for it.

   

Offline Adventurer

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Re: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2017, 09:26:45 AM »
I'm not an IBA member, but know and have met many of them through the FJR forum.

Getting certified for the Saddlesore 1000, which as you know if the most basic IBA certification, requires you to ride 1000 miles in 24 hours.  Even allowing for 6 hours of sleep, you only need to average 55 mph rolling to achieve this respectable accomplishment.  The easiest way to do that is to choose a route that:

1.  Includes interstates that have generous speed limits (70 mph minimum).
2.  Includes interstates that are not currently under large amounts of road construction
3.  Includes interstates that are not known to be heavy laden with traffic (I-10 between Houston and New Orleans would not be a good choice, for example)
4.  Includes planned fuel stops along the interstate at an exit that is very simple (on/off) and not congested with a bunch of other stores and crap.  This fuel stop needs to have at least two gas stations so you can make sure to get a documented receipt with your exact location, date, time, etc.  Many IBA efforts have been spoiled because the sole gas station had a pump without a working paper receipt machine.

Now - you also need a bike that has decent fuel range and wind protection, and can hold 70 mph on the slab without overstraining.  Certainly, a NH750 can handle that, but not without challenges.  When I had my NH750, living around sea level, my fuel mileage at 70mph constant would be in the 45 mpg range.  Given that, you must plan a stop every 200 miles.  That means you must make at least 4 stops to complete the challenge.  Still plenty doable given all other parameters.

Now, increasing to the butt burner gold 1500, things get a whole lot more interesting, especially with the fuel range of the NH.  Auxilliary fuel tanks can help that.

I've met some of the best LD riders in the world.  One guy I know is currently planning to ride a Multi-Trifecta BBG (more than one round of 3 consecutive Butt Burner Gold rides run consecutively) on an FJR with 200,000 miles currently on it.  Ironically, I just spoke with him a week ago while we were rallying at Yosemite.  These people are cut from a different cloth.  I liken them to marathon runners.  They want (need) to prove something to themselves.  I don't get it, but I get it - if that makes sense.

I think there are better bikes setup for LD riding than the nighthawk.  But with some basic planning and training, you can do it.  And if is something that interest you, I say go for it.

 

Awesome, thanks for the great advice and tips, hppants! I didn't even know stuff like IBA was a thing, until about a month or so now, but I'm intrigued, now that I do and will certainly keep you and NHF posted, if I pull the trigger.


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Offline skramer360

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Re: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2017, 07:01:05 PM »
I have not done an Iron Butt ride on my 700s, but I did do 750 miles in 13 hours on my 700s. I would not have been too difficult to sleep for a few hours and do another 250. Well, except my backside was very sore. I did the 750 miles again 4 days later in 13 hours. (I rode to my uncle's house in NE Pennsylvania from my house in Indiana.) I had to plan the gas stops to keep the stopping to a minimum.

Hppants- its good to see you on here again. Well reasoned opinion as usual.

Offline Adventurer

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Re: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2017, 11:13:08 PM »
I have not done an Iron Butt ride on my 700s, but I did do 750 miles in 13 hours on my 700s. I would not have been too difficult to sleep for a few hours and do another 250. Well, except my backside was very sore. I did the 750 miles again 4 days later in 13 hours. (I rode to my uncle's house in NE Pennsylvania from my house in Indiana.) I had to plan the gas stops to keep the stopping to a minimum...

Nice! Dude, you were almost there. Regardless, sounds like a great way to catchup with relatives. Well done.




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Offline Bajakirch

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Re: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2017, 09:45:53 PM »
Having moved on to a more ADV-styled bike (V-Strom) and being an avid podcast listener, I've started listening to back episodes of the Adventure Rider Radio podcast. While I don't see a 'round the world trip or a Prudhoe Bay-to-Ushuaia run in my near future, I've learned some interesting things by listening to interviews with 'traveling' motorcyclists.

One is that there is no perfect bike. Time and again, I hear these riders talk about people they know that have been planning a big trip for years, saving up money to get the F800GS or the latest KTM 1190 Adventure. And, while those folks are sitting at home waiting to buy the perfect ride, these riders have taken off on whatever they have available. Lois Price went around the world on a Kawasaki Sherpa 250 (a 'farm bike', as an irritated driver on the California 405 referred to it). Ed March circumnavigated the globe on a 30-year-old Honda C90 Super Cub. Peter and Kay Forwood visited every country in the world on a Harley Electraglide.

Whether it's that Great Big Motorcycle Adventure, an Iron Butt...or just a weekend overnighter, I've come to believe that the best bike to do it on is the one you already own. The pay-off is the doing, not what you're doing it on.
Get on your bikes and ride!

Offline hppants

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Re: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2017, 06:13:07 AM »
I certainly agree that going on the "wrong" "less ideal" bike is far better than not going at all.  However, as I do this touring thing more, for longer distances and for greater lengths of time, I've come to really appreciate having what I want in a motorcycle.  Eight years ago, just being in the wind was good enough for me.  The excitement of it, the idea of it, was more than enough to propel me.  Now - not so much.  As a simple example - could I have ridden 6300 miles earlier this month on my two week tour without cruise control?  Sure.  But will I ever buy a motorcycle without C/C again.  Not a chance in hell....

Offline Adventurer

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Re: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2017, 09:35:03 AM »
Having moved on to a more ADV-styled bike (V-Strom) and being an avid podcast listener, I've started listening to back episodes of the Adventure Rider Radio podcast. While I don't see a 'round the world trip or a Prudhoe Bay-to-Ushuaia run in my near future, I've learned some interesting things by listening to interviews with 'traveling' motorcyclists.

One is that there is no perfect bike. Time and again, I hear these riders talk about people they know that have been planning a big trip for years, saving up money to get the F800GS or the latest KTM 1190 Adventure. And, while those folks are sitting at home waiting to buy the perfect ride, these riders have taken off on whatever they have available. Lois Price went around the world on a Kawasaki Sherpa 250 (a 'farm bike', as an irritated driver on the California 405 referred to it). Ed March circumnavigated the globe on a 30-year-old Honda C90 Super Cub. Peter and Kay Forwood visited every country in the world on a Harley Electraglide.

Whether it's that Great Big Motorcycle Adventure, an Iron Butt...or just a weekend overnighter, I've come to believe that the best bike to do it on is the one you already own. The pay-off is the doing, not what you're doing it on.

True, sometimes you just gotta roll with what 'cha got, otherwise, it may never happen. You'll have the best familiariaty right off the bat that way too, no doubt.

I certainly agree that going on the "wrong" "less ideal" bike is far better than not going at all.  However, as I do this touring thing more, for longer distances and for greater lengths of time, I've come to really appreciate having what I want in a motorcycle.  Eight years ago, just being in the wind was good enough for me.  The excitement of it, the idea of it, was more than enough to propel me.  Now - not so much.  As a simple example - could I have ridden 6300 miles earlier this month on my two week tour without cruise control?  Sure.  But will I ever buy a motorcycle without C/C again.  Not a chance in hell....

Makes sense. I've never used or experienced C/C on a bike, but use it daily in our SUV's, so I'm sure it's a nice feature and better on the wrist, too. My budget's so tight, I'm often amazed I even have a bike, but am thankful and who knows what the future holds?

One thing's for sure, it's night and day how smoothly my NH rides, with the fairings and whatnot I've added. Haven't done the distances you guys have yet though, which I realize is the true test...

...and I can only compare it to what I've ridden thus far...

Owned: Yamaha XJ600 Seca II, Honda GL 145; Rented: Honda 90, Suzuki 125 & 250 (while on vacation/abroad).


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Offline Wahrsuul

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Re: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2017, 04:56:43 AM »
I certainly agree that going on the "wrong" "less ideal" bike is far better than not going at all.  However, as I do this touring thing more, for longer distances and for greater lengths of time, I've come to really appreciate having what I want in a motorcycle.  Eight years ago, just being in the wind was good enough for me.  The excitement of it, the idea of it, was more than enough to propel me.  Now - not so much.  As a simple example - could I have ridden 6300 miles earlier this month on my two week tour without cruise control?  Sure.  But will I ever buy a motorcycle without C/C again.  Not a chance in hell....

While I don't entirely agree haphap   I don't care for a Sport Tour with CC.  I have a throttle lock and rocker on my ST, and I prefer it that way.  However, on the Voyager, I like having the CC.  I'd ride either long distance, just depends on what I'm feeling at the moment.

Offline hppants

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Re: Ironbutt Association Challenge via Nighthawk?
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2017, 06:08:17 AM »
I'm curious, what makes you prefer the throttle lock on the ST bike over C/C?

 

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