Username: Password:

Author Topic: My '96 CB750 "Dragon Bike"  (Read 1685 times)

Offline DesertDragon

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 435
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 96 Honda NH
Re: My '96 CB750 "Dragon Bike"
« Reply #50 on: January 05, 2018, 10:32:30 AM »
I've said this mahttp://nighthawk-forums.com/Smileys/Custom/muhaha.gifny times before:  "It's a good deal if you think it's a good deal.  Doesn't matter what anyone else thinks."

I know a couple years ago, I was helping a friend find a Nighthawk.  Neither of us could find a running one for less than $1500 and the ones we did find weren't around long enough to even look at.  One guy sold his Nighthawk while he was on the phone with me and that was for $2500.  It was insane.  We finally found 650SC for $1500 and I'm pretty sure the only reason was because it was stolen.  But that's another story.

If you restrict yourself to one particular bike or criteria, you can expect to pay more or wait longer.  Sometimes you get lucky.  Waiting longer means time you're not riding.  There is value in that.  It's the same reason why amusement parks can charge extra for a Fast Pass ticket vs regular admission.   Time is money and vice versa.

I will agree with pants about the features of newer bikes, but they are features to me and not everyone.  The FJR is a pain in the ass to work on.  I don't work on my bike much so simpler maintenance is a non-issue for me, but others like a simpler machine because it is simpler to understand and work on.  Or they look at those features and see additional things that need to be maintained and/or replaced at a greater cost.  Take throttle or drive by wire for example.  There's no cable so it should last longer, but if it does fail, it's a $1000 bill rather than a $50 cable.

As for the fear of being stranded, a newer bike may help with that fear so alleviating that with a newer bike is worth something.  But you could be stranded no matter what vehicle you're driving for a million different reasons.  I agree with mollusc on this one.  Don't hold back until it gives you a reason not to.  Being stranded makes you have one bad day no matter how far away from home you are.  Fear of being stranded can make you miss a hundred great days.
DF,
I really liked your post. 
I think you pretty well articulated the entire new vs old thing, and that one man's features are another man's flaw...
Like a really pretty bike covered in plastic. 
Oooohhh it looks so sleek - If you like that it's a feature.
If you don't, it isn't.
In my case I have a practical reason. 
I've dropped my 'Hawk several times in the dirt up here - It's a very challenging dirt road environment - With case savers, the repair was dusting it off.
With a full bodywork fairing, the damage cost would be considerable.

Beyond that, I like the look of naked bikes, because the engine is part of the look of the machine, rather than it being an ugly hidden component under some bodywork.  I'm apparently not alone in that regard, evidenced by the resurgence of nakeds in the market.
 
It is also why I like air cooled engines - By design, they need to be out in the breeze where you can see them, and considerable art is used to make them look appealing.

Your experience in looking for a NightHawk for your friend was similar to my experience further back in the day.
A great condition, low mileage 'Hawk is increasingly hard to find, and pretty well impossible at a "low" price. 
I wanted a CB750 and it took me months to find the right bike.
For me, the cost and wait was worth it, as over the last going on 12 years, it's been a very easy machine to live with.

I've owned lots of bikes over the years, and I don't view the 'Hawk as a transition to an upgrade to something "better" sometime in the future, but that's me.  I like what I've got.

Despite the 'Hawk being an "old technology" machine (which it is) the market would seem to indicate their actual value is substantially greater than some might suppose. I contend that the "cream puff" low mileage NH750 for $1500 does not exist, and hasn't for some time as you found out...
Neither does the great condition $500 '57 Chevy exist.. 
BTW - A restored to original '64 VW window bus was just valued by Donald Osborn on Jay Leno at well over $100,000...
While older vehicles are less than current in their technology, that does not equate to diminished value.

There is a reason - While there are lots of current offerings being manufactured, classic machines that have a following are in shorter supply as time goes on.  While it can be truthfully said that a more modern machine can be had in a similar price, that doesn't mean it is a better value, because part of the value equation contains the variable "appreciation" (applicable to a limited supply) or its inverse - "depreciation" - applicable to any recently produced product....  So, over the near term, while a "modern" example of a bike in plentiful supply is likely to be reduced in value, the inverse is more likely in a bike that people want, but can't so easily get.

In other words, like you noticed, the market drives the cost by demand.
Keep the Rubber on the Bottom!

DD

Offline DesignFlaw06

  • *
  • Posts: 848
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 2006 Yamaha FJR
Re: My '96 CB750 "Dragon Bike"
« Reply #51 on: January 05, 2018, 12:34:55 PM »


Beyond that, I like the look of naked bikes, because the engine is part of the look of the machine, rather than it being an ugly hidden component under some bodywork.  I'm apparently not alone in that regard, evidenced by the resurgence on nakeds in the market.
 
It is also why I like air cooled engines - By design, they need to be out in the breeze where you can see them.

Your experience in looking for a NightHawk for your friend was similar to my experience back in the day.
A great condition, low mileage 'Hawk is increasingly hard to find, and pretty well impossible at a "low" price. 
I wanted a CB750 and it took me months to find the right bike.
For me, the cost and wait was worth it, as over the last going on 12 years, it's been a very easy machine to live with.

So, despite the 'Hawk being an "old technology" machine (which it is) the market would seem to indicate their actual value is greater than that indicated by those who apparently have not tried to buy or sell one lately.

The "cream puff" low mileage NH750 for $1500 does not exist, and hasn't for some time.

I don't think it is a resurgence of naked bikes.  Using the Nighthawk as an example, it's the law of supply and demand.  Supply has been decreasing because the Nighthawk hasn't been produced in 15 years.  The real problem is why the demand has not declined as fast.  I think it has less to do with Nighthawks are good motorcycles and more to do with they are easy to modify.  Nighthawks are one of those bikes that are bought to be executed by a Sawzall way too often.  Guys that want to turn it into a chopper/bobber only to find out that they've ruined the bike and it's uncomfortable to ride even out of the driveway.  Then they try to sell it for 3x what they paid because of all the "custom work".  And because none of these guys want to do custom work on a bike that already had custom work, those bikes are left to die.

It depends on where you live also.  Bike prices around here tank come October and you could probably get a Nighthawk for less than $2k.  It's also 2 degrees with about 4 feet of snow right now.  Come spring,  you can add another $500-$1000 to the average price.   Go ahead and wait until October, but you've lost an entire riding season.  What is an entire riding season worth to you?

The definition of low mileage is relative too.  I would consider any Nighthawk with 20,000-25,000 miles low at this point.   Then you get into the question of how many miles is too low.   Dry-rot tires, dead battery, fluids, etc.  are all things to consider on a bike that hasn't moved much.  A Nighthawk that only has 20,000 miles by now has been sitting a while.  Either the seller will tack that cost of repairs/maintenance onto the list price or you'll have to do it later.

None of these reasons discredit the Nighthawk as a quality motorcycle.  I just think the price increase is showing how few quality Nighthawks are left.   It's a little sad when you think about it.  We're approaching the end of an era.

Putting all of that aside, value your bike for what it does for you, not by what you could sell it for.

Online Larry Fine

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 400
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 96 NH 750
Re: My '96 CB750 "Dragon Bike"
« Reply #52 on: January 05, 2018, 08:12:50 PM »
Well said, Tim et al.  I can't afford to want another bike now, nor do I want to.  My '96 cost me $1100 I-don't-remember-how-many years ago (10?)with 16K miles on it. 

Other than the usual consumables, I've had to do no work on it, except for the wheel bearings, which were less than $20 for generic correct-number parts, and one battery. 

It could use a new valve-cover gasket, which I have but can't find right now, but doesn't leak enough to run low on oil between changes.  It's the Timex watch of motorcycles.

Offline DesertDragon

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 435
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
  • Bike: 96 Honda NH
Re: My '96 CB750 "Dragon Bike"
« Reply #53 on: January 06, 2018, 08:04:44 AM »
Some good comments..
Minimal required corrective action has been my experience as well, Larry.

The bad news, as stated by DesignFlaw, is that there are fewer examples left as each day passes.

The good news, is that for those of us lucky to own a 'Hawk, is that not only do we have a reliable bike that we can ride, but we're also riding a classic. and people love classics.
I agree that "value your bike for what it does for you, not by what you could sell it for", and by this measure, I am getting that value.
But when you do need to sell it, there won't be a buyer shortage.

It provides another reason that makes the effort of keeping your bike in good condition worthwhile.


Keep the Rubber on the Bottom!

DD

 

Copyright © 2006 - 2018 Nighthawk-Forums.com
All Rights Reserved