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Author Topic: What's Your NightHawk Worth?  (Read 4725 times)

Offline Dindindin

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Re: What's Your NightHawk Worth?
« Reply #50 on: March 10, 2019, 02:11:57 PM »
Black betty only goes out in the dry now. I have a 1200 bandit fully tricked up. Wish i could show pictures. My most favourite bike of all time. My 15 year old daughter has labeled her name on it for when i pass betty to her.. She already does basic preventative maintenance....the only thing i really cannot get is a bellypan or " chin spoiler " as you lot call them,  i would pay to have one shipped to me.

Offline hppants

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Re: What's Your NightHawk Worth?
« Reply #51 on: March 12, 2019, 06:34:45 AM »
The big bandit is an excellent sport touring bike.  I prefer the 1250, as I am done with motorcycle carbs.

Offline DesertDragon

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Re: What's Your NightHawk Worth?
« Reply #52 on: March 12, 2019, 09:45:59 AM »
A different perspective....
IMHO, Carbs provide the rider with an opportunity to "bond" with their bike.
Simple, inexpensive tools, a short time together and the reward of improved performance.  Cost is the quality time spent, which for a NightHawk, isn't much.
Pretty hard to get that experience when tuning requires hooking up your computer controlled bike to an expensive machine to tune it.

Although it takes a bit more care, carbs are not that hard to live with, and when repairs are needed, it's one that someone of average ability can do themselves cheap.
Obviously some prefer the drop off at the shop and get the "reamed in the wallet" method of motorcycle maintenance.
Others prefer to do the work themselves....
Is it just me, or does this forum about Nighthawks lean towards those who like to do their own repairs....
Keep the Rubber on the Bottom!

DD

Offline mollusc

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Re: What's Your NightHawk Worth?
« Reply #53 on: March 12, 2019, 10:10:00 AM »
i think most vehicle forums are predominantly populated with people who work on their machines.  it's the same on the land rover forums that i'm on, and the nc700 forum.  just a function of interest and necessity.
however, i can't say that many of those people seem to really get deeply into performance tuning, whether it's with carbs or efi.  more a matter of just trying to get the vehicle to run well.  with efi you generally don't have to do anything to make it run well, whereas carbs can require some finesse and persistence.  so, again, a function of necessity.
i have bikes with both systems.  once i got the carb bike (the nighthawk) running well, i haven't had to do anything to it.  the efi bike (nc700x) was running well when i got it, so i haven't had to do anything to it.  so the majority of my experience with them has been identical.  i can't say whether one system performs better than the other of course, since the two bikes are vastly different.
made of meat

Offline DesertDragon

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Re: What's Your NightHawk Worth?
« Reply #54 on: March 13, 2019, 10:18:37 AM »
Points well made mollusc.
I agree that carbs on a Hawk don't require much, but I have noticed a benefit in synching them as a part of my annual maintenance.
If (when) you have an efi problem, I doubt a repair is going to be as easy, and that was my point - Not how effective one system is over the other.
Obviously a computer controlled system can provide data inputs on O2, temperature etc etc stc... but these systems and sensors allso provide for the opportunity of additional points of failure that can be difficult or impossible for the average person to assess and correct without expensive specialized tools.
As far as which is more robust.... My bike is about to be 23 years old in July and it runs as well or better than it did when I acquired it more than a dozen years ago.
Time spent on carb maintenance over that time - Not much.
I'm pretty sure the bike will outlast my hips!
BTW - Still running super and still getting 50MPG @75mph on the highway.


Keep the Rubber on the Bottom!

DD

Offline mollusc

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Re: What's Your NightHawk Worth?
« Reply #55 on: March 13, 2019, 12:49:13 PM »
i'm not so sure about the "when" regarding efi problems.  i've had multiple vehicles with efi since the mid 1990s.  not one of them has ever had a problem in that area.  granted, my nc is my first efi bike but none of what i have read about it gives any indication that there is any tendency towards it being a problem area.
i agree that resolving an efi problem probably involves far more replacement than repair.  at a guess i'd say that the only really repairable components of an efi system would be the pump and the injectors.  any other bits are going to be swaps for new or known-good parts (electronics, pressure lines, sensors, switches, etc.).  diagnosis can certainly be a murky process and really does require specialty tools.  but so does carb tuning.


i suspect that the underlying, niggling question that bothers a lot of people who learned to work on carburetted motorised vehicles is "what do i do if i break down in the middle of nowhere?"
the assumption being that a carb system could be repaired on the side of the road, at least well enough to get a person to a civilised location, but that an efi system would leave you s-o-l.
unless you have a roadside assistance package.  which may be just as fast and effective as a roadside repair, but which doesn't give you a good "i fixed it myself!" story at the end.
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Offline hppants

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Re: What's Your NightHawk Worth?
« Reply #56 on: March 14, 2019, 06:15:54 AM »
Respectfully, if everyone viewed things this way, we would still be pushing carts with stone wheels.

There is no basis for being concerned about the reliability of any part of an EFI engine, motorcycle or otherwise.  The data just doesn't justify it.  Any motorcycle built in the last 12-15 years (BMW, KTM, exotics excluded) only requires the service manual to diagnose any ECU related problems.  The days of needing a laptop and mechanics certifications are long over.

However, with the worldwide use of ethanol blended fuel, there IS inherent concern for the reliability of older carb'd motors.

Comparing the nighthawk to any modern motorcycle (on any level - performance, value, design - anything) is ridiculous and unfair to both sides of the argument.  Any motorcycle (or any THING for that matter) is worth whatever the market is willing to pay.  In that light, the nighthawk is comparatively worth more than its closest market comparison.

No matter what you ride today, you owe a lot of what's under your arse to the Honda CB750.  The entire world motorcycle community (over the age of 45) knows this, and as such, the nighthawk commands (deservingly) the respect and value it gets.  That kind of stuff is great for tire kickers, posers, and the like.

But most RIDERS file that stuff in the back of their minds and move on.  There's just too many (s)miles to go....


Offline DesertDragon

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Re: What's Your NightHawk Worth?
« Reply #57 on: March 14, 2019, 11:27:41 AM »
I've got to agree with the CB750 comment..
The bike was a game changer.  I owned a 1974 version.
It also took a lot of work to keep it in an ideal state of tune.

There were a lot of reasons I chose the NightHawk.
 - Legendary reliability
 - Ease of maintenance
 - Cheap to insure
 - Style
 - Versatility
 - Mileage

As far as problems go, the bike has never left me stranded so the "side of the road" fix was not part of the EFi vs carb argument equation for me.
It is more of the "what do I need to keep it running" consideration. 
I can do everything I need to do without visiting a shop, and hands down, the NightHawk is the easiest bike to live with that I've ever owned, and I've owned a lot of bikes.
 
The argument that EFI over carbs equates to not advancing beyond stone wheel carts is pretty ridiculous.
I would not attempt to argue that EFI is problematic, but that doesn't mean this "advancement" is without added complexity, because it is more complex.
Anyone who was intellectually honest would have a hard time saying that carburation is less reliable than EFI, because it just isn't true.

Some people like everything to be computerized.  I don't.  I prefer analog.  It works.  Newer does not always equal better.

One could argue that only water cooled engines are worthwhile, but they also add complexity, weight and maintenance considerations.
They are also can be pretty ugly when exposed.

Some people prefer a "naked" bike - Myself I prefer a good looking air cooled motor out in the breeze over a plumbing shop covered by easily damaged expensive plastic bodywork.  With case savers, I've hit the dirt on more than one occasion and never had to replace any plastic parts that would have been ruined by the same impact.

Some people are only satisfied by the latest and greatest.  Others are happy with something that continues to work well. 
In my case I like the ride I'm riding.
To each their own.

 
Keep the Rubber on the Bottom!

DD

 

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