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Author Topic: Father's Day Fun  (Read 1524 times)

Offline Bajakirch

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Father's Day Fun
« on: June 15, 2014, 11:25:18 PM »
My plans for Fathers' Day were up in the air until I woke up at 5:30 a.m. that morning. If the weather looked good, we take out boat out for its inaugural voyage of the year. If the predicted T-storms looked imminent, we'd spend the day around the house and then head in for dinner and a movie. But if the nasty weather seemed far enough away, I'd try to squeeze in a morning ride.

I awoke and immediately checked the radar -- any potential storms looked far enough away to at least give me until mid-morning. So I quickly geared up, packed up the bike and hit the road.

I really didn't have any true idea of where I was going, so I just rode. The bike seemed to want to head north, so I crossed the Mighty Wisconsin River and followed it's western bank up towards Devil's Lake State Park. This is been a popular starting point for several of my rides this year, I can't really say why.

Maybe because of this:


Devil's Lake and the East Bluf

And this:


Rock and roll.

Then I made my way over to a short uphill set of switchbacks that are fun to ride.


I hereby dub thee 'The Tail of the Devil'.

I rode on up to Baraboo and pulled into the parking lot for the local municipal services building. This sign caught my attention:


Time is of the essence.

I'm not sure who or what the Timekeeper is, but he/she seems to be held in great esteem in Baraboo.

About 4 miles west of Baraboo, I saw a sign pointing me to the Mid-Continent Railway Museum. I've known about this museum for a while, and have seen their staff and volunteers doing demonstrations and talks all around the community. I even had a neighbor's kid who was enamored with trains, got his degree as a diesel mechanic, volunteered at the museum and ended up getting his dream job -- yep, he's workin' on the railroad, all the live-long day.

Just outside the small village of North Freedom (pop. 701) I found the museum.



The museum's not huge, mainly a collection of about a half-dozen steam and early diesel locomotives, maybe 10-15 cars, and a few structures recognizable from the hey-day of American railroading. But they're earnest about their mission to preserve the railroad heritage and I respect that.

It was still early on a Sunday, so I couldn't get into any of the cars or the few outbuildings where they had a few displays and some of the more pristine engines and cars. But I wandered around for around 15 minutes and snapped a few shots.















The Railway Museum fell on some hard times a few years ago, as the same storm that did this:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmJZrnHZFV4
also flooded the museum's grounds. Recently, the Wisconsin State Historical Society took over ownership of the museum. Hopefully they'll be able to infuse some state government money into it to help build it back up. I dropped a few bucks into a donation can to help with the effort.

By now I was getting hungry. North Freedom didn't have much to offer in the way of gustatory satisfaction, so I rode on to the next town of any size. That happened to be La Valle. Downtown La Valle had just what I was looking for, a little comfort-food establishment call LJ's Restaurant. I settled in and ordered myself a Mexican omelette.


I'm keeping this one from my dietician.

Stuffed full of artery-clogging cholesterol, I headed out of La Valle and opted for some of the famed Alphabet Roads. Highway G offered a warning sign you won't find in many places around the country.


What goes clip-clop-bang, clip-clop-bang? An Amish drive-by shooting.

The Amish were probably all still at their Sunday meetings, so I didn't have to dodge many buggies on this trip.

Next were Highways I, D, K and maybe a few others I've forgotten.


Why I Ride.

Along the way I came across this perfectly picturesque church on a hilltop. I had to stop for a photo-op.


A heavenly vision.

Upon closer reflection, I realized that keep things pretty basic in these parts.


Your classic two-holer.

By this point it was getting later in the morning so I turned the bike's nose towards home. It was just as well, as the threatened (but as-of-yet unmaterialized) storms had kicked up some fierce winds. For once, I was happy to have a big, heavy bike; even with our combined weight of nearly 800 lbs., some of the side winds I was getting were almost pushing me over into the opposing lane. In some open areas I was leaning a good 20 degrees into the wind to keep the bike straight.

I pulled into the garage just before noon. The bike ran well all morning, although I started having a problem with the starter button where I'd have to push it a few times before the bike would start. When I arrived home, I shot a little WD-40 into the switch to hopefully clean the contacts a bit. I also noticed a few drops of oil hitting the ground when I parked it. I suspect this is still due to my weeping shift shaft seal; I don't think it's leaking any more than normal, but I haven't washed the bike at all this year and the oil's been accumulating enough to drip. My very slight coolant leak is back too; I have to track that down one of these days -- hopefully just a loose hose or clamp after my coolant change several weeks back.

When I walked into the house, the first thing my wife asked was if I wanted to open my Fathers' Day presents. But of course! Who turns down presents? My gifts from her and my 2 sons:


I sense a theme...

When I opened the DVD, my wife explained that, as part of her gift to me, she would sit through one complete showing of the movie without a single eye-roll or heavy sigh. I took her up on it and, for my first time, watched a movie I've been anxious to see ever since I heard about it.

Further Dad-Day activities included picking up my boat from the repair shop, spending some time on the Interwebs, heading out for a hearty steak dinner, watching the new Tom Cruise movie (better than expected) and watching a little MotoGP.

It's good to be a dad. It's better to have a family that, at least once a year, expresses their affection so well.
Get on your bikes and ride!

Offline Wosmo

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Re: Father's Day Fun
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2014, 04:32:37 PM »
Great report Baja! You even included some food porn...

BTW, if you're interested in railroad heritage... http://www.lsrm.org/Home/index.html You'll be in Duluth anyway...  :naughty:

Offline Bajakirch

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Re: Father's Day Fun
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2014, 08:12:08 PM »
Cool link; might be worthy of a stop.

Thanks.
Get on your bikes and ride!

Offline Hog Dog

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Re: Father's Day Fun
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2014, 08:56:38 PM »
Nice report Baja.  It is nice to feel the family appreciation on Father's Day.  My wife rode about 30 miles(seems to be her limit) with me after she and our daughters spoiled me all day.
Lucky Lindy's evil twin

Offline Grey13

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Re: Father's Day Fun
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2014, 08:13:12 AM »
Great report Baja!  While we've never stopped there, every year we pass Baraboo on the way to Ely, MN.  I love that part of the country.


Ray

Offline umpire

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Re: Father's Day Fun
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2014, 09:31:02 AM »
 haphap Nice report and great pics , Baja .
 My Son and I went out for a 40 mile 2 lane country road mini tour on father`s day.
I was nice and let him ride my 700s. haphap
Any Idea what the big turbine fan blades were used for on the brown rail car ?, interesting what ever its purpose is/was ...
Umpire

Offline Wosmo

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Re: Father's Day Fun
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2014, 03:59:20 PM »
haphap Nice report and great pics , Baja .
 My Son and I went out for a 40 mile 2 lane country road mini tour on father`s day.
I was nice and let him ride my 700s. haphap
Any Idea what the big turbine fan blades were used for on the brown rail car ?, interesting what ever its purpose is/was ...
Umpire
It's a giant snowblower.... Seriously, it really is!

Offline OJ Buyer

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Re: Father's Day Fun
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2014, 04:40:32 PM »
Nice report, Baja! I miss all the reports from the old site as they are my favorite part of this forum. Aren't too many now and I am glad that you contribute as oft as you do. Keep up the good work!

Offline shifther

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Re: Father's Day Fun
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2014, 03:22:46 PM »
When I opened the DVD, my wife explained that, as part of her gift to me, she would sit through one complete showing of the movie without a single eye-roll or heavy sigh.

llaugh1 And what did she think of it? More importantly, what did you think of it?

Offline Bajakirch

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Re: Father's Day Fun
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2014, 05:37:06 AM »
When I opened the DVD, my wife explained that, as part of her gift to me, she would sit through one complete showing of the movie without a single eye-roll or heavy sigh.

llaugh1 And what did she think of it? More importantly, what did you think of it?

She held up her end of the bargain, but her attitude toward riding with (or without) me wasn't changed.
Get on your bikes and ride!

 

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